Yuki Clothing

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Transformational Reconstruction (TR Design)

Example of dress made using Transformational Reconstruction

Example of dress made using Transformational Reconstruction

Earlier, I promised you a post about a cool pattern making technique and here it is – Transformational Reconstruction! The designer behind the idea is Shingo Sato. As far as I know, he’s written one book on the subject, holds workshops and to top it off, runs a Youtube channel with “watch-and-learn-guides”.

The basic idea behind TR Design is to manipulate your  garment in 3D and not in 2D. Begin by creating a muslin with fitting of your choice and then fit it onto your mannequin (or other test subject). Next step is to grab a pen and draw your design straight onto the muslin. When your happy with your new design, remove the muslin from the mannequin and cut it open. You will most likely have a flat pattern ready to use by now but it that’s not the case, I recommend having a look at the video TR Cutting School – Easing and Forming. The last step is to cut out the new pattern pieces in a proper fabric and sew everything together.

I’m actually trying this out when making the pattern for my wedding dress. So far, I’m rather happy with this way of working. I had to make quite a few adjustments on my second muslin after noticing that there’s a huge difference in making a dress with one shoulder-strap and two shoulder-straps. Apparently one needs to make a really fitted bodice if one expects it to stay in one place. Today I learn. On the plus side, I just had to remove the straps and make the darned thing smaller and then later on, reattached the straps. Bridezilla transformation: successfully aborted! BOYAH!

Some day (when I’ve finished the dress) I’ll try out an even more elaborate design using transformational reconstruction.

For more information, I recommend checking out the Youtube channel, http://www.youtube.com/user/trpattern


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Lilac cordial

Tulip vs Lilac. Striking resemblance?

Tulip vs. Lilac. Striking resemblance?

Usually, I stick to writing about my sewing adventures but tonight it’s time to share a great recipe for making lilac cordial. It was last year that I, to great surprise, found this recipe. For some reason, I was certain that lilacs were poisonous. Whatever gave me that idea, I don’t know. Perhaps I thought of tulips? Anyway, I’m still alive after drinking it for an entire summer :)

Went to visit my parents today and took the opportunity to raid their lilac tree. Naively, mum thought I was picking the flowers to look at them – not to eat them. Oh boy, could she have been more wrong :) And when we got home, I picked the first lemon on our lemon tree. I reckon making my own sugar is a bit over the top so this is as home-made as it gets ;)

Ingredients:

1l water
1kg sugar
~30 lilac clusters
1 lemon
20g tartaric acid

Mix water + sugar and bring to a boil. In the meantime, remove most of the branches from the clusters and slice the pre-washed lemon. Put the flowers and lemon in a heatproof bowl. When the sugar/water mixture is boiling, add the tartaric acid and pour it over the flowers. Let it cool down and store it in the fridge for 3 days. Strain through a sieve cloth and pour into cleaned bottles. Done!

When serving, mix with water to your taste. Mix it with sparkling water (with some lemon/lime) for an awesome non-alcoholic drink.

Lilac cordial. My fiancé said that the first picture I took looked like scrimps and lemons so I had to take another one. Hopefully this one looks more like flowers than scrimps :)

Lilac cordial in the making! My fiancé said that the first picture I took looked like shrimps and lemons so I had to take another one. Hopefully this one looks more like flowers :)

The end result!

The end result!